Game Instructions

RADAR CHAOS HAWAII EDITION - INSTRUCTIONS

Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition is a serious game. Air Traffic Controllers often regard their work as a 'three dimensional chess game'. The idea is to give the user a taste of real-world air traffic control. It is not like conventional games. There is no 'game over', nor are the levels sequential. You simply choose where you would like to work, and how busy you would like to be. As in the real world of air traffic control, you must strive to move aircraft as efficiently as possible, minimizing delays, avoiding conflicts and midair collisions, and giving pilots their appropriate route and altitude at all times.

You will find this game fun and challenging by it's demand for awareness and visualization. It can be a frustrating experience, and often too stressful for some. However, it's a great game for those who want something serious, requiring thought. This isn't a game. It's designed upon real-world procedures.

YOUR JOB

Guide arrivals and departures to their destinations while maintaining the required separation between all aircraft and avoid terrain. If you haven't tried the original Radar Chaos, it's a suggested first step. If you have not tried the original, don't despair. You can get yourself up-to-speed with these instructions.

Pilot voice responses can be heard in this simulation, with the option of disabling sound.

In addition to providing separation to aircraft, your job is to clear all aircraft direct their outbound waypoint (depicted by the solid red route line), at their final altitude (specified in red within the aircraft's control panel).

Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition.Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition

CONTROL PANEL

To play this simulation, access an aircraft's control panel by clicking on it's tiny white square. In the image above, you will notice flight information (Delta Flight 137, Heading is 246, altitude is flight level 400, speed is mach .80, proceeding direct MAGGI). Mileage to the next waypoint can be turned on or off, as can the aircraft's future path. More on these two features below.

DATA BOARD

At the bottom right corner of the screen, you will see a tab called "Flight Data". Click on it and it brings up information about every flight. At a glance you can see what altitude and routing every aircraft has been given. You also can see what's coming next.

INFO BAR

At the bottom of the screen is the game information bar. It shows you what your safety and efficiency rating is, as well as the number of planes moved and time played. You will also find controls that look similar to a music player. The game can be paused, fast-forwarded and stopped. Voice can be turned on or off, and a radar information overlay can be shown or hidden. At the bottom left corner of the screen are buttons to display 'future paths' and 'mileage' for all aircraft in your control. More about these below.

HANDOFFS

When an aircraft enters or leaves your airspace, responsibility for controlling that aircraft must go with it. When you receive an aircraft from an adjacent sector, you will see a flashing H. You must click this H to accept responsibility for that aircraft. Only then will that air traffic controller give the aircraft to you. An aircraft will call you approximately 10 seconds after you accept the handoff.

When an aircraft is leaving your airspace, you must open the aircraft's control panel and click "HANDOFF". You will observe a solid H, which means the adjacent air traffic controller has not yet accepted your handoff. Once the H begins flashing, the adjacent controller has accepted your handoff, and you may now switch the aircraft to that controller by clicking "SWITCH" in the aircraft control panel.

Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition.Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition

It is easy to see what must be done with each aircraft, by checking it's control panel. The panel shows you what waypoint to direct the aircraft to, as well as what altitude to assign. There is no need to memorize routes and altitudes.

Arrivals are different. They require some special handling. Before an aircraft can land on a runway, it must establish itself on an ILS approach path with your help. The ILS paths are red dotted lines. Aircraft must intercept these ILS paths by the following rules:

Maximum intercept angle of 30 degrees;

Level at 3000 feet;

Intercept at least 10 miles from the airport (indicated by a red < symbol);

Must be given an "approach clearance";

If you want to get fancy, you can make the aircraft intercept at only 7 miles, provided they are level at 2000 feet.

Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition.Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition

In the image above, we have a localizer that is 080 degrees. That means the intercept angle should be 050 degrees (or 110 degrees if coming from the other side of the localizer). Watch the vectoring video below.

CONTROL METHODS

There are three types of control that you can provide to aircraft in this application: direction, altitude and speed. These are implemented by clicking on an aircraft, which displays the control interface. Initially, when you 'mouse over' an airplane you will see a red line, which indicates the aircraft's route. Once you click, you will see the control interface.

HEADING

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An aircraft's direction (or 'heading') is controlled by simply dragging the red arrow to the desired direction. This simulation can be played without the need for many heading assignments, as most controllers will separate traffic by altitude first. The "Direct" button is often all the directional instruction needed. Heading assignments (or "vectors") are required to establish aircraft on the runway arrival path (ILS).

ALTITUDE

Altitude is assigned by 1,000 foot increments, by tapping the up/down buttons. Speed is assigned by 10 knot increments, by tapping the fast/slow buttons. Aircraft that are above 25000 are generally flying 'mach speed', which is somewhat different from 'air speed' in that it relates to an absolute value equivalent to that of the sound barrier, roughly 660 miles per hour.

As a shortcut, you do not need to click 'submit', but simply 'mouse away' from the interface. The interface will close and all control assignments will then be applied to that aircraft.

SPEED

INDICATED AIRSPEED VS TRUE AIRSPEED

One thing new ATC sim enthusiasts quickly notice is the disparity between the airspeed that has been assigned to an aircraft, and the speed value shown on the aircraft's data tag. Indicated Airspeed is the value a pilot sees on their instruments, and is simply measuring air pressure, like a tire pressure gauge does. This indicated value underreads with an increase in altitude, since air becomes thinner at higher altitudes. When a pilot attempts to maintain an assigned airspeed, it's true speed is greater. So an aircraft at 3000 feet will fly a speed that is approximately 10 knots greater than assigned, and an aircraft at 10,000 feet will fly a speed that is approximately 50 knots greater than assigned.

This takes some getting used to. It is the system used in the real world. You may have tried other simulations that omit this. In our opinion, it's not a real ATC simulation if it does not employ this speed model.

MACH VS AIRSPEED

If an aircraft flies high enough, airspeed becomes almost useless. An aircaft at a typical cruise altitude of 37000 (Flight level 370) will have a speed of 450 knots, but their airspeed indicator will register only 250 knots. At altitudes above approximately 25000 feet (flight level 250), pilots will fly based on mach speed instead of indicated airspeed. Mach speed is the measure of an aircraft's speed in relation to the speed of sound.

ADVANCED READING (OPTIONAL)

If an aircraft's ideal cruise mach speed is .80 and they commence a descent for landing, their indicated airspeed will gradually increase as they enter thicker air. If the pilot maintains mach .80, the airspeed will eventually reach the aircraft's maximum "never exceed" airspeed - the maximum speed that guarantees that wings and other pieces of an aircraft will not fall off. This varies, but is typically 330 knots. At this point during descent for landing, a pilot must maintain this airspeed, and allow it's mach speed to decrease.

This mach-airspeed transition is something to consider in our simulation. If an aircraft is descending from it's cruise altitude with an assigned mach speed (say you assigned them mach .75 because of traffic), it becomes rather meaningless once they've transitioned to airspeed. If your intention is to make an arriving aircraft fly slower, you would therefore have to assign a mach speed as well as a transition speed (say mach .70, and transition at 270 knots). This probably seems complicated. Don't even worry about it while you are learning this simulation. When you reach the point where you consider yourself an advanced player, go ahead and give an assigned transition speed.

RESPONSE DELAY

When you tell a Boeing 737 to change heading, altitude or speed, it requires time for things to actually happen. This can be frustrating for the 'newbie' who knows nothing of air traffic control. After you give a pilot an instruction, expect to wait up to 15 seconds before you actually see a response to this. In particular, speed changes require time. In this simulation, responses are accelerated slightly. In real life, changes take even longer to happen.

When a pilot is told to descend from 9000 feet down to 3000 feet, the pilot requires 5 seconds to reach forward and make the adjustment to the autopilot control interface. The aircraft then gently reduces engine power and lowers it's nose, which requires another 5 seconds. By the time you observe any change on the radar display, 15 seconds have gone by and you may be wondering if the pilot even heard the instruction.

SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS

In the real world of air traffic control there are separation requirements that must exist between each and every aircraft. It is not simply enough for aircraft to 'miss each other'. There are two basic types of separation: lateral and vertical. If you have the necessary lateral separation, vertical separation is not needed, and visa verca.

LATERAL SEPARATION: In this application you must maintain a lateral distance of at least 3 miles between all aircraft, unless vertical separation exists. In the high-level sectors, this requirement is 5 miles.

VERTICAL SEPARATION: You must maintain a vertical distance of at least 1000 feet between all aircraft, unless lateral separation exists.

IN-TRAIL SEPARATION: All aircraft headed for the same waypoint must be spaced by at least 10 miles, to avoid overwhelming the next air traffic controller down the line. This can be achieved by selecting an aircraft's "MILEAGE" in their control panel, which shows it's distance to the outbound waypoint. These aircraft mileage values can be compared, to ensure the minimum is achieved, through speed control or 'delay vectors'.

In the left image below, you see arriving aircraft properly spaced on the runway ILS path. In the right image below, you see aircraft with proper in-trail sequencing for MAGGI. Note the 'mileage' values at the tops of the data tags. These aircraft will all be at least 10 miles in trail of one another as they cross MAGGI.

Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition.Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition

 

TOOLS

FUTURE PATHS

Future paths are green, and can be selected for individual aircraft or all aircraft using the bottons at the bottom left corner of the screen. These paths show you where the aircraft will be in 2 minutes, and take into account speed, climb/descent, and heading changes. These are extremely useful for conflict avoidance.

ALTITUDE ARCS

Altitude arcs are green, and are displayed whenever the user hovers over an aircraft target. No arc is displayed for aircraft in level flight. The arc depicts where the aircraft will reach it's assigned altitude.

Air Traffic Control Game.Air Traffic Control Game

ROUTE LINES

Route lines are red, and are displayed whenever the user hovers over an aircraft target. These paths display the route the aircraft has been assigned.

WARNING LINES

Similar to the green future paths. However, these are red in color, and automatically display whenever a future conflict exists. Specifically, the computer checks for any conflicts that will occur within the next two minutes. A 'conflict' is a situation where there is not necessarily any danger, but a likelihood of less than the required separation exists. Conflict lines take into account speed, climb/descent, and heading changes. These are extremely useful for conflict avoidance, but can easily become relied upon too much. Caution should be used. "Safety Rating" is penalized whenever these lines are present.

CONFLICT LINES

Conflict lines are light blue, and automatically appear between two aircraft that are in close proximity to each other. These are meant to assist the player when two aircraft have the potential to conflict.

Radar Chaos Hawii Edition.Air Traffic Control Games

 

PENALTIES

SAFETY and EFFICIENCY values start at 50%. Each minute, these values are increased by 1%.

KNOCK BACKS

SAFETY
If a predicted conflict exists, safety gets knocked back 1% per 5 seconds.
If an aircraft gets directed into terrain, safety gets knocked back 20%.
If a loss of separation occurs, safety gets knocked back 20%.
If an collision occurs between two aircraft, safety gets knocked back 30%.

EFFICIENCY
If an aircraft is handed off at the wrong altitude, efficiency gets knocked back 10%.
If an arrival is not landed, efficiency gets knocked back 10%.
If an arrival is not given the correct routing, efficiency gets knocked back 10%.
If an aircraft is not properly handed off, efficiency gets knocked back 10%.
If an aircraft is not switched after a handoff, efficiency gets knocked back 5%.
Exessive control instructions reduce the efficiency rating.

VIDEOS

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ENROUTE PROCEDURES

Watch the HD version

Radar Chaos Hawai Edition: Part 1 from Big Fat Simulations on Vimeo.

TRACON PROCEDURES

Watch the HD version

Radar Chaos Hawaii: Honolulu TRACON from Big Fat Simulations on Vimeo.

SEQUENCING HIGH LEVEL TRAFFIC

Watch the HD version



VECTORING

Watch the HD version


SECTOR-SPECIFIC INFORMATION

Radar Chaos Hawaii Edition is the airspace around the Hawaiian Islands, broken into six sectors. There are two high level sectors, (High North and High South) and four low level sectors (Kauai, Oahu, Maui and Hawaii) each around the busier islands. Below you will find information and videos regarding the specific differences between each of these six levels.

High North Sector

This sector is north of the islands and includes all the airspace from sea level (zero feet) up to 60,000 feet, or “flight level 600” (FL600) as pilots call it. For the purposes of this game, the player would not descend an aircraft below 17,000’ and the highest aircraft will not climb above FL410.

The minimum SEPARATION in this sector is either 5 miles or 1,000 feet.

ARRIVALS to the islands will come from three fixes in space, ATINE, BITTA and WAPPO. The player will descend the aircraft as they near one of the four island sectors they are flying to. Aircraft landing at Lihue (PHLI) and Hilo (PHTO) shall be descended to FL260 before being given a “handoff” to the next sector. Aircraft landing at Honolulu (PHNL) and Maui (PHOG) shall be descended to 17,000” prior to the handoff. Aircraft being handed off to the same sector shall be at least 10 miles apart for maximum efficiency.

Tip: Most aircraft will fly three miles for every 1,000’ of descent. If an aircraft needs to descent from FL370 to 17,000’ it will require about 60 miles to lose the 20,000 feet. This is sometimes referred to as the 1:3 ratio rule of thumb. Faster aircraft will require more distance as they descend at the same rate, but cover more distance in the same length of time. There is an expedite feature available when needed!

Tip: At higher altitudes (usually above 28,000’) aircraft will fly at a Mach speed (percentage of speed of sound) instead of an Indicated Airspeed (IAS). When climbing and descending through this range, the aircraft will transition from one speed to the other. Different aircraft will transition at different altitudes and speeds.

DEPARTURES from the islands will do the opposite. Departures from PHLI and PHTO will climb to FL250 (providing 1,000’ separation from arrivals) and departures from PHNL and PHOG will climb to 16,000’ before the player then assigns a higher altitude. Keeping the aircraft separated from other aircraft, the player should assign the aircraft’s planned altitude as soon as they can. This may require a step-up with multiple level-offs to avoid other aircraft. Also, the aircraft shall be assigned direct to the appropriate exit point, TOADS, SHARK and AZIBA.

For arrivals and departures, don’t forget to handoff the aircraft before they leave your airspace. Once accepted (flashing H), you must then switch frequencies. Both of these actions are at the bottom of the drop down list within the control panel.


High South Sector

This sector is south of the islands and includes all the airspace from sea level (zero feet) up to 60,000, or “flight level 600” (FL600) as pilots call it. The sector also includes the airspace directly above each island sector. For the purposes of this game, the player would not descend an aircraft below 13,000’ and the highest aircraft will not climb above FL410.

The minimum SEPARATION in this sector is either 5 miles or 1,000 feet.

This sector might start off slowly, but it can quickly become a hornet’s nest of chaos! Not only are there arrivals and departures, there are inter-island aircraft that contact you for higher altitudes, only to be quickly handed-off to another island sector. Also, some aircraft travelling to and from the HIGH NORTH sector will briefly contact you for a climb or descent through your airspace. Many of the airways are used in both directions. It is suggested you play this sector after gaining some experience in the other five sectors first!

TIP: Remember to keep westbound aircraft at even altitudes (FL340) and eastbound aircraft at odd altitudes (FL350). If unsure, keep aircraft separated by at least 1,000 feet until you are sure they won’t scrape paint.

ARRIVALS will descend to 17,000 feet, except for PHNL, where aircraft will descent to 13,000 feet. The “ASSIGN ALT” in the control panel will show the correct altitude. Aircraft should be within a few thousand feet of the assigned altitude by the time they reach the next sector boundary. Arrivals to the same airport shall be at least 10 miles apart for maximum efficiency.

DEPARTURES will climb to 16,000 feet until you assign them a higher altitude. Make sure they are eventually going to their planned exit point and are as close to the planned altitude as possible, before handing-off to the next sector.


Kauai Sector

This is the most westerly of the main islands and surrounds Lihue airport. The airspace is capped at 16,000 feet. This is a fast-paced, small airspace and is the largest scale of all the sectors, giving it a zoomed-in feel. There are large mountains in the middle of the island and three smaller airports that aircraft will depart from. Players will be busy integrating these aircraft with the arrivals and departures from Lihue.

The minimum SEPARATION required in this sector is either 3 miles or 1,000 feet.

ARRIVALS will come from five different routes and all will land at Lihue airport. Players should vector aircraft to intercept final at a 30-degree angle. The runway heading is 350 degrees, so aircraft arriving from the west should intercept on a 020 degree heading, and aircraft arriving from the east should intercept on a 320 degree heading. Following the 1:3 ratio rule, aircraft should intercept final at a distance that is 3 times the altitude. For instance, aircraft at 2 thousand feet should intercept final at least 6 miles from the runway, and aircraft at 3 thousand should intercept final at least 9 miles from the runway. There is an arrow placed at the 10-mile mark as a guide.

Tip: Aim for 5 miles between arrivals and watch how close they get as the first aircraft lands, and then you can run them closer as you become more skilled.

Just as pilots will do in real life, the aircraft in this game will automatically slow down as they get close to an airport. Keep this in mind if using close to minimum separation between aircraft. It is not uncommon to lose 2 miles of spacing between aircraft that are on final approach.

Tip: Try and keep aircraft vertically separated if their paths will cross and then “ladder” the second aircraft down as the first aircraft descends. Aircraft that are 20 miles apart can quickly become very close. When all else fails, vertical separation will work!

DEPARTURES will exit the sector at 5 fixes. Four of these fixes are the same (yellow-dotted lines) as the arrival routes. This will require either vectoring the aircraft clear of the arrivals first, or handing off the aircraft to the next sector so they can climb above the arrivals. All jets will climb to 16,000, and smaller propeller aircraft will climb to lower altitudes.

The SID (standard instrument departure) from Lihue is a 080-degree heading and climbing to 5,000 feet. Keep this in mind if you have small aircraft over Lihue at 5,000 feet, which is common. You may choose to climb the smaller aircraft or stop the departure at 4,000… or just hope it works!

The aircraft departing from the 3 smaller airports tend to be slower aircraft that typically want to depart at 5,000 or 7,000 feet. These aircraft will exit the sector at BOOKE, which is depicted at the end of the red dashed line on the right side of the screen.

Don’t forget to HANDOFF and SWITCH the aircraft before they reach 16,000 feet or leave your airspace horizontally.


Oahu Sector

On the Island of Oahu is Honolulu (PHNL) airport, located close to the beaches of Waikiki. The airspace is capped at 16,000. This is the busiest of the Hawaiian airports and has multiple runways to accommodate a large volume of traffic. Because the islands are basically volcanoes poking out of the Pacific Ocean, there are mountains close to the airport.

The minimum SEPARATION required in this sector is either 3 miles or 1,000 feet.

ARRIVALS will come from three different routes and will land on two different runways at PHNL airport. All jet aircraft will land on Runway 08 Left, and all propeller aircraft will land on Runway 04 Left.

Tip: Hold the curser over an aircraft and a solid red line will show you which runway approach the aircraft will fly.

Players should vector aircraft to intercept final at a 30-degree angle. For runway 08 Left, the proper intercept headings would be 050 degrees and 110 degrees. For runway 04 Left, the proper intercept headings would be 010 degrees and 070 degrees. Following the 1:3 ratio rule, aircraft should intercept final at a distance that is 3 times the altitude. For instance, aircraft at 2 thousand feet should intercept final at least 6 miles from the runway, and aircraft at 3 thousand should intercept final at least 9 miles from the runway. There is an arrow placed at the 10-mile mark as a guide.

Tip: Aim for 5 miles between arrivals and watch how close they get as the first aircraft lands, and then you can run them closer as you become more skilled.

Just as pilots will do in real life, the aircraft in this game will automatically slow down as they get close to an airport. Keep this in mind if using close to minimum separation between aircraft. It is not uncommon to lose 2 miles of spacing between aircraft that are on final approach.

Tip: Try and keep aircraft vertically separated if their paths will cross and then “ladder” the second aircraft down as the first aircraft descends. Aircraft that are 20 miles away can quickly become very close. When all else fails, vertical separation will work!

DEPARTURES will exit the sector at 5 fixes, 2 to the east and 3 to the west. All jets will climb to 16,000, and smaller propeller aircraft will climb to lower altitudes.

All aircraft will depart runway 08 Right. The SID (standard instrument departure) is heading 155 degrees and climbing to 5,000 feet. Honolulu tower will not give you a fast jet immediately behind a slower propeller plane.

Tip: Consider leaving the departing aircraft level at 5,000 feet until clear of the congested airspace south of the airport. Also, arrivals from the Northeast can be vectored north of the airport to avoid departures – just watch out for the mountains!

Don’t forget to HANDOFF and SWITCH the aircraft before they reach 16,000 feet or leave your airspace horizontally.


Maui Sector

The island of Maui has two large volcanoes on either side, and Kahului airport (PHOG) lies in a valley between the two. This sector is capped at 16,000. While there is plenty of space to the south of the airport to do some fancy air traffic control work, the airspace on either side of the airport is unusable unless an aircraft is high enough.

The minimum SEPARATION in this sector is either 3 miles or 1,000 feet.

ARRIVALS will come from four different routes and will land on runway 02. Players should vector aircraft to intercept final at a 30-degree angle. The appropriate intercept heading would be 050 degrees if approaching from the west, and 350 degrees if approaching from the east side of the airport. Following the 1:3 ratio rule, aircraft should intercept final at a distance that is 3 times the altitude. For instance, aircraft at 2 thousand feet should intercept final at least 6 miles from the runway, and aircraft at 3 thousand should intercept final at least 9 miles from the runway. There is an arrow placed at the 10-mile mark as a guide.

Tip: Aim for 5 miles between arrivals and watch how close they get as the first aircraft lands, and then you can run them closer as you become more skilled.

Just as pilots will do in real life, the aircraft in this game will automatically slow down as they get close to an airport. Keep this in mind if using close to minimum separation between aircraft. It is not uncommon to lose 2 miles of spacing between aircraft that are on final approach.

Tip: Try and keep aircraft vertically separated if their paths will cross and then “ladder” the second aircraft down as the first aircraft descends. Aircraft that are 20 miles away can quickly become very close. When all else fails, vertical separation will work!

DEPARTURES will exit the sector at 5 fixes. All jets will climb to 16,000, and smaller propeller aircraft will climb to lower altitudes. You may be required to vector aircraft around the mountains before assigning them direct their exit point. The SID (standard instrument departure) from PHOG is a 360-degree heading and climbing to 5,000 feet.

Don’t forget to HANDOFF and SWITCH the aircraft before they reach 16,000 feet or leave your airspace horizontally.


Hawaii Sector

Sometimes referred to as the Big Island, the Hawaii sector will make you wish you could focus each eye on a different place and have two conversations at the same time. There are two main airports in this sector. Kona (PHKO) is on the west side of the island, and Hilo (PHTO) is on the east side. There are large mountains in the middle of the island and not much airspace over the water to vector aircraft. It is not uncommon to have two things to do at the exact same time. This sector is capped at 16,000 feet.

The minimum SEPARATION in this sector is either 3 miles or 1,000 feet.

ARRIVALS will come from 5 entry points into either airport. Players should vector aircraft to intercept final at approximately a 30-degree angle. The appropriate intercept heading for PHKO would be 140 degrees from the west, and 200 from the east. The appropriate intercept heading for PHTO would be 230 from the north and 290 from the south. Following the 1:3 ratio rule, aircraft should intercept final at a distance that is 3 times the altitude. For instance, aircraft at 2 thousand feet should intercept final at least 6 miles from the runway, and aircraft at 3 thousand should intercept final at least 9 miles from the runway. There is an arrow placed at the 10-mile mark as a guide.

Tip: Aim for 5 miles between arrivals and watch how close they get as the first aircraft lands, and then you can run them closer as you become more skilled.

Just as pilots will do in real life, the aircraft in this game will automatically slow down as they get close to an airport. Keep this in mind if using close to minimum separation between aircraft. It is not uncommon to lose 2 miles of spacing between aircraft that are on final approach.

Tip: Try and keep aircraft vertically separated if their paths will cross and then “ladder” the second aircraft down as the first aircraft descends. Aircraft that are 20 miles away can quickly become very close. When all else fails, vertical separation will work!

DEPARTURES will exit the sector at 5 fixes. All jets will climb to 16,000, and smaller propeller aircraft will climb to lower altitudes.

The SID (standard instrument departure) from runway 17 at PHKO is heading 295 degrees and climbing to 5,000 feet. From runway 26 at PHTO, aircraft will turn right and intercept a 345-degree track and climb to 5,000 feet.

Tip: It might be easier to level off some departures at a lower altitude if any arrivals are already down at 7,000 feet or lower.

Don’t forget to HANDOFF and SWITCH the aircraft before they reach 16,000 feet or leave your airspace horizontally.




REFERENCE MATERIAL


AIRPORT IDENTIFIERS

CYVR - Vancouver, Canada
CYYZ - Toronto, Canada
KSEA - Seattle, USA
KSFO - San Francisco, USA
KPDX - Portland, USA
KORD - Chicago, USA
KJFK - New York, USA
VHHH - Hong Kong
RJAA - Tokyo, Japan
ZBAA - Beijing, China
WSAP - Singapore
RPLL - Manila, Phillippines
VABB - Mumbai, India
YSSY - Sydney, Australia
NZAA - Auckland, New Zealand
PHLI - Lihue
PHNL - Honolulu
PHOG - Maui
PHKO - Hilo
PHTO - Kona

AIRLINE IDENTIFIERS

WJA - Westjet
ASA - Alaska
ACA - Air Canada
UAL - United
DAL - Delta
AAL - American
HAL - Hawaiian
JAL - Japan Air
CES - China Eastern
PAL - Phillipine
CPA - Cathay
SIA - Singapore
NZA - New Zealand
QAS - Qantas
HOP - Hop Air
CAL - Air China

 

 

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